sexta-feira, 29 de junho de 2012

25 Ways Teachers Can Connect More With Their Colleagues | Edudemic

25 Ways Teachers Can Connect More With Their Colleagues | Edudemic:


A growing criticism of the American education system is that teachers spend too much of their time distanced from their colleagues (a recent survey found that teachers spend just 3% of their school day collaborating with other teachers), encouraging competition rather than collaboration, and making it difficult for teachers to work together to solve educational and institutional issues.
Things don’t have to be that way, however, as there are many ways that teachers can reach out and connect with their colleagues and build a more collaborative atmosphere in their schools. We’ve come up with just a few here, but feel free to share your own experiences and ideas that can help other educators to connect and ultimately improve the quality of instruction they can offer students.
  1. GET ON THE SAME PAGE.

    One of the biggest obstacles to connecting with other teachers is making sure that you’re all on the same page. Everyone should know what’s expected of them and be made a valued part of the team. From there, it’s much easier to build relationships and figure out the next steps to take to improve the quality of education kids receive.

“The fact that I, as a teacher, get to assume the role as facilitator and guide gives me the extra energy to really see the students as individuals, and to challenge their individual competences and talents.” – Denmark | daily edventures

“The fact that I, as a teacher, get to assume the role as facilitator and guide gives me the extra energy to really see the students as individuals, and to challenge their individual competences and talents.” – Denmark | daily edventures:

Martin Linded, Pre-primary Teacher - USA


Martin Lindved’s passion for technology started early, when he got his first game console in the 1980s. Since then, he’s managed to combine his love of technology and play to create meaningful learning experiences for his students. Lindved’s latest innovation, The Digital Tarzan Track (DTT), brings together all of his experience in working with children. Using the didactic model, the approach combines the three things that are crucial in successful teaching and learning: ICT, play and movement. Lindved has been sharing his innovation with other educators, and sees his students gaining real 21st century skills, even as pre-schoolers. Here, Lindved tells us more about DTT, and offers up some insights on the changing role of teachers and the resulting opportunities for innovation.

SocialEdCon: What the Heck Do We Do with Social Media? | Edutopia

SocialEdCon: What the Heck Do We Do with Social Media? | Edutopia:


Betty Ray
Betty Ray is Edutopia's senior blog editor and community manager. She was one of the organizers for TEDxSFED in San Francisco and is a regular blogger for Edutopia. Follow her on Twitter @EdutopiaBetty.

Greetings from sunny San Diego. I’m here for the annual ISTE conference and its innovative kick-off gathering, SocialEdCon -- the one-day unconference formerly known as EduBloggerCon. (Organizer Steve Hargadon changed the name to reflect the change in emphasis from blogging to the larger social media universe that brings educators together.)
Topics this year ranged from how to expedite technology adoption to the impact of technology on social and emotional learning; blended learning; and tools and ideas for making media in the classroom. (See the entire SocialEdCon schedule) Over the next week or so, we’ll hear from some of these participants as guest bloggers here on Edutopia.
In the mean time, I wanted to cover some of the many discussions around social media. Clearly social media is here to stay, yet many educators are still grappling with what the heck to do with it.

Industry needs more young scientists and mathematicians, says BAE chief | Technology | The Guardian

Industry needs more young scientists and mathematicians, says BAE chief | Technology | The Guardian:

Six out of 10 UK jobs will need engineering-friendly skills but only one student in 10 takes key subjects beyond 16


industry-science-maths-bae
Pupils in a science class at Kirkley Middle School, Lowestoft, Suffolk. Not enough pupils are studying science and related subjects beyond the age of 16, according to BAE's Nigel Whitehead. Photograph: Si Barber for the Guardian
Britain faces a "national problem" over the lack of young adults studyingengineering-friendly subjects such as maths and science, according to a senior executive at Britain's largest manufacturing employer.
The head of BAE Systems' UK business, Nigel Whitehead, will warn in a speech on Friday that too few school leavers and undergraduates are tackling the subject areas of science, technology, engineering and maths (Stem).
Pointing to statistics showing that only 10% of people in the UK study Stem subjects beyond the age of 16, Whitehead predicts consequences for British industry because up to six out of 10 UK jobs over the next decade will require Stem skills.

quinta-feira, 28 de junho de 2012

"What's Worth Learning?" is Key Question for PBL Worldwide | Edutopia

"What's Worth Learning?" is Key Question for PBL Worldwide | Edutopia:



Suzie Boss

Editor's note: Today is the second in a series of posts from PBL World, a global gathering of educators interested in project-based learning. Join the conversation on Twitter by following the hashtag #pblworld.
When Claudia Urrea was growing up in Colombia, her family made a point of doing projects together. Whether they were focused on fun -- "building the coolest kite" -- or more practical household matters, projects taught her the value of learning by doing.
Today, as director of learning for the One Laptop per Child initiative and a member of the Lifelong Kindergarten group at the MIT Media Lab, Urrea is an advocate of project-based learning as a strategy to improve education throughout the developing world. With 2.5 million kid-friendly laptops now in the hands of children across Latin America and Africa, One Laptop per Child is disseminating not only affordable technology but also the pedagogy of student-centered, connected learning. "Projects move students from being told what to do to owning their learning," says Urrea.

181 Google Tricks That Will Save You Time | Edudemic

181 Google Tricks That Will Save You Time | Edudemic:


Back in 2009, we published 100+ Google Tricks That Will Save You Time in School. But in nearly three years, Google has developed new products, discontinued a few, and offered new features, and more people have found great ways to save time with Google. So we’ve gone and found even more great tips for saving time with Google, and this time around, the list has made it all the way to 181 different tricks. Explore our collection of tricks to find new, faster ways to search, read email, manage your time, and more.
Search Tricks
 
Google is so much more than a search engine. It’s a reference book, calculator, even a weather forecaster. Using these tricks, you can find helpful information quickly, plus get to the right links faster.

The Best 9 Free Websites That Offer Free eBooks for Teachers

The Best 9 Free Websites That Offer Free eBooks for Teachers:


Education nowadays is talking digital and probably by the year 2020 most of the schools in the US and Canada will have already embraced digital textbooks. Digital learning is gaining ground day after day and the sooner we embrace it the better.
ebooks



There are several ways teachers can benifit from this digital boom in education. One of them is digital reading. This is a kind of reading that is completely free of any charge and can take place anywhere, anytime. I am talking about a set of great websites that provide free ebooks for all kinds of learners and covering a plethora of different subject areas from literature and arts to science and technology. I have been researching into some of these resources and came up with the list below. Enjoy

quarta-feira, 27 de junho de 2012

The Intersection Between the Common Core and School Culture - Transforming Learning - Education Week

The Intersection Between the Common Core and School Culture - Transforming Learning - Education Week:

Transforming Learning


Communications scholar Marshall McLuhan once said, "We don't know who discovered water, but we know it wasn't the fish." Water shapes a fish's existence so profoundly — and, swimming right in the middle of it, the fish can't grasp how water impacts them. In education, a school's "water" is its culture, that complicated combination of shared values, norms, beliefs, and expectations. It manifests in actions as simple as the way a principal recognizes staff accomplishments, and as complex as the processes staff members use to mediate conflict or the ideas that shape student motivation.
School culture is hard to characterize and cultivate, but it's arguably the defining factor in school change. Shifting culture could prove to be the trickiest — but most essential — piece of today's most pressing education challenge: implementing the Common Core State Standards.
Schools in most states across the country spent the last school year dipping a toe into the Common Core, learning about the new benchmarks, mapping curricula to uncover gaps in learning, and reshuffling schedules to facilitate discussion of the standards. But if last year, for many districts, involved wading in the shallow end of the pool, this year schools will need to fully dive in. Principals and teachers have a demanding road ahead of them, as they prepare to accommodate new assessments and work with districts to solidify curricula. But despite the myriad challenges, the principals we've talked to are looking forward to the future. Their buzzwords? Collaboration, innovation, and reflection.

40% of 11 Year Olds Don't Read for Fun | Education News

40% of 11 Year Olds Don't Read for Fun | Education News:

There is concern that children are failing to read for pleasure and are developing minimal attention spans that hamper academic study.



A study by the publisher Pearson has found that concern in schools about children’s reading ability and desire is widespread. By the age of 11, when children move from primary to secondary school in the UK, teachers claim that over 40% of students fail to read for pleasure. While a decline in the amount of time spent reading recreationally is to be expected in a modern world that holds more competing objects of attention such as television and the internet, having so many children abandon books completely is potentially troubling.

Why It’s Important to Understand Google Ranking | MindShift

Why It’s Important to Understand Google Ranking | MindShift:


"Question Mark Made of Puzzle Pieces" by Horia Varlan
"Question Mark Made of Puzzle Pieces" by Horia Varlan
Students rely heavily on ranking–or how search tools decide the order in which to display results–to help them select sources to read. Most of us do, but the data about students comes from researchers Andrew Asher of Bucknell University and Lynda Duke of Illinois Wesleyan University.
The researchers presented the findings of their latest study and forthcoming paper on how university students do research, at the American Library Association Annual conference, and in the talk they emphasized some of their takeaways about what research skills should look like, including an overall focus on critical thinking skills and the ability to evaluate the quality of sources.
Because of the reliance on ranking, Asher and Duke argue, it’s critical for students to have some understanding of how each search tool they use makes these decisions.
To that end, here are a few resources to help understand and communicate with students about how Google ranks search results. Understanding the fundamentals of ranking will help students write better queries and make better choices about where to click.

“Families who choose online education for their children want the exact same thing that any parent wants – the best education for their kids – they are just choosing a different way to get it.” – USA | daily edventures

“Families who choose online education for their children want the exact same thing that any parent wants – the best education for their kids – they are just choosing a different way to get it.” – USA | daily edventures:

Stephanie Hoaglund, Director of Social Media, K12 Inc., USA


As someone who embraces social media and understands its benefits, it is very hard for me to grasp the concept of those in education not embracing it,” says Stephanie Hoaglund.
Hoaglund is the director of social media at K¹², America’s largest provider of online education for grades K through 12. Their mission is to “fulfill the promise of education for every child.”
Hoaglund, a parent of two and a popular blogger in her own right (she started blogging after her husband’s cancer diagnosis), has seen education from the traditional “brick and mortar” perspective and the newer, online approach. She is passionate about the use of social media in education.  “It’s powerful and if used correctly, can make a huge impact on students, parents, admins and anyone else!” she says.  “There is nothing complicated — it’s just a different way to hold a conversation with someone, to connect with them, to enlighten them.”  She leads the K12 corporate blog, thinktanK12, their Facebook pageYouTube presence and Twitter feed.
Today, she provides insight on why she believes in online education – for any child – and where she believes innovative learning truly begins (hint: it’s not in a classroom!).

10 Incredibly Powerful Teaching Tools of the Future | Edudemic

10 Incredibly Powerful Teaching Tools of the Future | Edudemic:




In the June issue of Edudemic Magazine for iPad, we take a look at 10 ideas for enabling tomorrow’s learning today.
Utopian visions of learning are tempting, if for no other reason than they absolve us of accountability to create itright now, leading to nebulous romanticizing about how powerful learning could be if we just did more of X and Y.
But therein lies the rub: Tomorrow’s learning is already available, and we tracked down 10 trends, concepts, and resources to make it happen.

25 Great Educators To Follow On Pinterest | Edudemic

25 Great Educators To Follow On Pinterest | Edudemic:


The following is a cross-post from our content partners over at Best Colleges Online
Pinterest is such an exciting medium for collecting educational resources. It’s a great place for academics to share some of the best finds, resources, and learning opportunities in a visual format that’s appealing to students and researchers alike.
We’ve found 25 academics that are doing just that, sharing their very own collections of educational and interesting pins. We encourage you to see how they’re using the site, plus check out the amazing finds they’ve collected.

SocialEdCon: What the Heck Do We Do with Social Media? | Edutopia

SocialEdCon: What the Heck Do We Do with Social Media? | Edutopia:



Betty Ray
Betty Ray is Edutopia's senior blog editor and community manager. She was one of the organizers for TEDxSFED in San Francisco and is a regular blogger for Edutopia. Follow her on Twitter @EdutopiaBetty.

Greetings from sunny San Diego. I’m here for the annual ISTE conference and its innovative kick-off gathering, SocialEdCon -- the one-day unconference formerly known as EduBloggerCon. (Organizer Steve Hargadon changed the name to reflect the change in emphasis from blogging to the larger social media universe that brings educators together.)
Topics this year ranged from how to expedite technology adoption to the impact of technology on social and emotional learning; blended learning; and tools and ideas for making media in the classroom. (See the entire SocialEdCon schedule) Over the next week or so, we’ll hear from some of these participants as guest bloggers here on Edutopia.
In the mean time, I wanted to cover some of the many discussions around social media. Clearly social media is here to stay, yet many educators are still grappling with what the heck to do with it.

So, What the Heck Do We Do with Social Media??

Social media is arguably the single most disruptive innovation in the history of industrialized civilization. It’s redefining how we engage with each other, how we do business, how we get our news, how we spend our free time and how we revolt against repressive regimes. It’s no wonder that people are terrified of it. And to that end, it’s not surprising that many educators find themselves in schools where social media is blocked -- and/or with draconian social media policies in place.

terça-feira, 26 de junho de 2012

40 Blogs for Special Needs Parents | Edudemic

40 Blogs for Special Needs Parents | Edudemic:




ECE (Exceptional Child Education) is a growing part of accountability in public education. And with the expansion of technology–including Apple’s recently-announced update to their iOS–learners with special needs have more tools than ever to accommodates their individual needs.
Social media is a great place to turn to keep up with this technology, as can platforms like Edudemic. But if you’re needing something a bit more niche and specific, a blog dedicated to a more narrow “sliver” of education can be a life-saver–an excellent source of resources and ideas.
Here are 40 blogs for the parents of learners with special needs.

Think, Wonder, & Teach: Teaching with Technology

Think, Wonder, & Teach: Teaching with Technology:

I have been meaning to write this post since April but haven't found the time. I received an email earlier this week asking for advice and I knew it was time to finally sit down and write this.





I am so grateful and so blessed by winning an opportunity to attend this event. I would not have been able to afford to attend without Janaye. So thank you... again!

Every one of the speakers had something relevant and wonderful to share. However, Cara had the most impact on me. Each day I learn more and more about how I MUST incorporate technology into my teaching but rarely does one hear about how. Cara not only tells you how but shares it as well.





I recently learned that instead of purchasing a ticket for the whole event, you can now purchase it by the speaker at Teacher's Notebook. When I looked, they were on sale for $4 per one hour talk. So worth every penny!

I have used several different forms of technology with my own children and in my lesson plans. I won't spoil all the surprises Cara has in store for you but I will share my favorites below. Also, check out Cara's blog for more great ideas including samples of student's work.

Karl Gude: Five Reasons Why Twitter Is Amazing In Large Lecture Classes

Karl Gude: Five Reasons Why Twitter Is Amazing In Large Lecture Classes:

2012-06-10-473371_10150921350871934_985573056_o.jpg
Image by Colin Marshall



The guest professor in my large class of 200 journalism students at Michigan State University was just hitting his stride when suddenly every single student plunged to the ground as though looking for a dropped pencil. Stunned, the speaker continued his talk. About 15 minutes laterthe students leapt to their feet and applauded furiously! Shattered, he began to realize that something he was saying, some word, was igniting this explosive response from the students.
At the time I was on a flight to Denver and the speaker was doing me a favor taking over my class. As the plane was about to land I got a text message from him (yes, I had my phone illegally turned on) that simply said, "You're dead!"
He was right to blame me ... and Twitter.
Now, I wouldn't advise doing this to just any old professor. This was a good friend of mine and I knew he would appreciate a Gude joke. The day before class I had tweeted my students a couple of times encouraging them to commit these outrageous acts whenever my friend spoke a certain word.
Now why would I do such a mean thing? Usually, when a class has a substitute teacher, students just ditch it. Or if they do come to class, they ignore the speaker and spend their time on Facebook. But this little joke caused them to not only attend class (who wouldn't want to miss the fun?) but also to listen intently to every single word the speaker said. Mission accomplished: class was packed and they did well on the quiz I gave later on the material.

Top 15 Android Apps for Children’s Education

Top 15 Android Apps for Children’s Education:

Android is the mostly and widely used Operating system nowadays. Android is a mobile system software having operating system, middleware and key applications. Android was first developed in U.S. California at Palo Alto in 2003 by Andy Rubin, Rich miner, Nick sears and Chris White and latterly it was adopted by Google. In Smart Phones, Android is a strong operating system supporting a huge number of applications. Due to these advance applications, user’s life has become more comfortable and responsive. Android has a dominating role in several applications which are present in android world, and developers have chance to make it more advance.

Android Apps for Kids Education


Whenever we talk about Education, the very first think comes in our mind is School. Amongst us, most of the people have strong belief that a typical setup of classroom and school can give their ward a quality and worthy learning, while few of them have totally different point of view regarding education, they think that education have several forms in a specific environment which differs from each and every way. Off course giving a thought to education, we are stepping ahead towards our upcoming generation success. By educating them we are developing our society’s economy individually, and in future we will have responsible citizens with us plus a good combo of intelligence and talent.

Now here, we are going to feature top 15 Android Apps for Kids Education which are useful for your kids brain development, choose the best one for your kids to give their mind a proper growth.

- Top 10 Sites for Educational Apps

- Top 10 Sites for Educational Apps:

The wave of the future is here, especially for education.  Terms like 21st Century Computing, BYOD (Bring Your Own Device), and Cloud Computing are mainstream.  The introduction of mobile devices, iPods, netbooks, and more specifically, the iPad, has brought technology to more students than ever before.  A one-to-one computing environment is not only a possibility, but also a reality in more school districts than people realize.  With all that being said, below are my 10 favorite sites for finding educational apps.

  1. APPitic - Great site with over 1300 reviews done by Apple Distinguished Educators.  These apps have been tested in different grade levels with different instructional strategies.
  2. Mind Leap -  Excellent site with reviews built on a five-star scale.  Reviews are done on a wide range of subjects and offers a nice breakdown of statistics such as educational quality, engagement factor, and shelf life.
  3. Best Kids Apps -  Site with great reviews on iPhone, iPad, and Android apps.  These reviews have a basic age rating and a nice image to go along too.
  4. Mac App Store - Probably the most comprehensive list of apps around.  This application from Apple is the ideal place to find and purchase apps.  Works on Snow Leopard OS and above.
  5. Fun Educational Apps -  Ideal place to find reviews of apps for the iPod, iPhone, and iPad.  This is one of my favorite sites to find in-depth reviews with lots of pictures of the app.
  6. Smart Apps for Kids - Designed by a dad on a journey to find the best iPhone & iPad apps.  These apps are reviewed on a four-star scale and offer a nice "bottom line" for those who don't want to read the whole review.
  7. Best Apps for Kids - Wonderful site that does a great breakdown of an educational app, with reviews done on a scale of  one through five.  Offers readers advice on whether they should purchase the app or not.
  8. Teachers with Apps -  Great site with reviews of apps that include videos and images.  Ideal for teachers looking to find that perfect app for the classroom.
  9. Apps in Education - Nice collection of iPad apps that are reviewed by subject.  These reviews are brief and to the point.
  10. I Education Apps Review - Designed as a community effort of reviews posted by a variety of users.  There are even student reviews to give a unique perspective on the use of an app.

Comprehensive Education > Reading, Math, and Science — Whole Child Education

Comprehensive Education > Reading, Math, and Science — Whole Child Education:





ASCD and more than 25 other major education organizations (including several whole child partners), representing a wide array of subject areas, are promoting consensus recommendations for how federal education policy can better support subject disciplines beyond reading, math, and science. The recommendations are a response to proposals that could threaten schools' and districts' ability to provide students with a comprehensive education that prepares them to graduate from high school ready for success in college, careers, and citizenship, and that narrows the definition of such readiness to only the Common Core State Standards.
The Obama administration has suggested collapsing programs that support arts, history, civics, foreign languages, geography, and economics into one initiative, requiring these subjects to compete against one another for resources. The administration has also proposed a similar consolidation that would pit programs for school counseling, physical education, and safe and drug-free schools against one another; while recent congressional decisions have aimed to reduce or defund many of these important programs.
To ensure that each student is prepared with the knowledge and skills required for success after high school graduation, ASCD and its partner organizations call on Congress to include all elements of a comprehensive education in any definition of college, career, and citizenship readiness. The groups also call on lawmakers to maintain discrete and significant funding for disciplines beyond reading, math, and science and to promote grant competitions within the disciplines, not between them.

“Involving students in their learning to create personal paths and collaboration is helping them, but competition and individualism is getting in the way of learning.” – Finland | daily edventures

“Involving students in their learning to create personal paths and collaboration is helping them, but competition and individualism is getting in the way of learning.” – Finland | daily edventures:

Merja Narvo-Akkola, Program Manager - Finland


Merja Narvo-Akkola is fortunate to be an educator in a country recognized as one of the best at educating its citizens, but she isn’t taking anything for granted. “No one was more surprised by the PISA results and Finland’s relative high standing than the Finns themselves,” Narvo-Akkola has said. In Finland, most students begin compulsory schooling at age seven, and much emphasis is placed during the early years on play, oral language and social skills development. The system has short school days, finishing at 1 p.m., for teachers and students. And there is no system-wide standardized testing.
Narvo-Akkola believes that Finnish schools achieve excellence by focusing not on competition, but on cooperation and equality.
Her own mission is to promote those values as a leader, and to ensure that her city’s schools, like those in the rest of Finland, continue to live up to their stellar reputation. Today, Narvo-Akkola shares with us her views on what makes Finland’s schools special, and what educators everywhere can learn from her country’s approach to education

6 Tips for the Successful Online Teacher -- THE Journal

6 Tips for the Successful Online Teacher -- THE Journal:





In recent intake interviews with new students of education at West Texas A&M University, I found that teaching online is the new Holy Grail for many young K-12 educators. They dream about how wonderful it would be to spend part of their day working from home in their bunny slippers and to conduct meaningful interactions with students via Skype while preparing dinner. To this group, teaching online means never having to be anywhere at any particular time, never having to wear uncomfortable "professional clothes," and never being asked a question without having time to research the answer.
After two decades in online teaching in both the corporate world and higher education, I regret to report that the grass is not necessarily greener on the other side of the network connection. While online teaching offers many rewards for instructors, it takes a special set of skills and attitudes to excel at it. And these are emphatically not the same skills and attitudes that make an exceptional classroom teacher. Here's the mindset it takes to be a successful online teacher:

iPhone, iPad apps meld music lessons, video games | News | eClassroom News

iPhone, iPad apps meld music lessons, video games | News | eClassroom News:


Some music experts have dubbed this the "gamification" of music education, a way of making sometimes-grueling practice more enjoyable.
Don’t kid yourselves, guitar heroes: Racking up mega-scores with that fake guitar won’t get you any closer to playing the real thing. But if students really want to learn the guitar or another instrument, a number of apps for the iPad and iPhone can help—and students will feel like they’re still playing a video game.
In fact, some music experts have dubbed this the “gamification” of music education, a means for making sometimes-grueling music learning more palatable and enjoyable.
A handful of apps with St. Paul, Minn., connections are a part of this high-tech music-education surge.
Tone Target, developed by J. Anthony Allen at the McNally Smith College of Music in downtown St. Paul, is a dead ringer for Guitar Hero.
Dots representing tones endlessly flow on an iPad screen, similar to how the video game behaves. Replicate each of the tones on cue using an instrument or your voice, and you become a music titan.

Yong Zhao: PBL Develops Students' Creative Confidence | Edutopia

Yong Zhao: PBL Develops Students' Creative Confidence | Edutopia:



Suzie Boss

Editor's note: Today is the fourth in a series of posts from PBL World, a global gathering of educators interested in project-based learning. Join the conversation on Twitter by following the hashtag #pblworld.
Yong Zhao, author of Catching Up or Leading the Way, kicked off the third day of PBL World with a fast-paced tour of global education challenges and a ringing endorsement of project-based learning as a key strategy to help students succeed.
Countries around the world -- and especially China, where Zhao grew up -- are eager to help children "develop the skills, confidence, and creativity to survive in the 21st century," he said. Students in Shanghai may be able to produce world-class test scores, he added, but that doesn't mean they will be prepared to take advantage of future opportunities.

Google Brings Free Wi-Fi to Some New York Subway Stations - NYTimes.com

Google Brings Free Wi-Fi to Some New York Subway Stations - NYTimes.com:




This summer, New York subway riders might be able to actually get some work done on the train (rather than just beating their high scores in Temple Run). Beginning Monday, free Wi-Fi will be available at a number of stations courtesy of Google.
Boingo Wireless, the Wi-Fi provider well known for its wireless service for airports, has teamed up with Google Offers, the search company’s Web page for getting deals, to offer the free Internet. Google is paying for the service from now until Sept. 7.

An iPad on Legs: Is ActivTable the Next Interactive Whiteboard? | MindShift

An iPad on Legs: Is ActivTable the Next Interactive Whiteboard? | MindShift:


Promethean
By Lillian Mongeau
In the race to develop the classroom of the future, tech giant Promethean has taken another step forward this year with a new product called ActivTable. Think iPad on four legs.
The newest gadget is the latest in Promethean’s range of interactive classroom products—smart boards, classroom response systems that resemble game show buzzers, teacher dashboards—and is the first of the company’s products designed especially for small group learning.
The table is about the size of a wide coffee table and comes up to the hips of the average adult. It’s a 46”, high-definition LCD touch-screen. The surface is covered in “gorilla glass” for durability. It can respond to touch from up to six kids at a time. Students stand around the table, using it for all sorts of activities, from sorting vocabulary words to working out math problems to basically anything you can think of that can also be done with paper and pencil.

Malawi school kitchen to be named in honour of school meal blogger Martha | World news | The Guardian

Malawi school kitchen to be named in honour of school meal blogger Martha | World news | The Guardian:

Publicity surrounding the banning of NeverSeconds blog led to £85,000 going to the charity the nine-year-old was supporting

School meals blog
Pupils at Lirangwe primary school in Malawi show their thanks to nine-year-old blogger Martha Payne. Photograph: Mary's Meals/PA
A school kitchen being built in Malawi is to be named in honour of a nine-year-old blogger who has raised £85,000 for charity.
Martha Payne started the NeverSeconds blog six weeks ago, posting daily pictures of, and opinions about, her school lunches.
The blog has received 6m views and won the support of celebrity chefs Jamie Oliver and Nick Nairn.
On Friday Martha was told by Argyll and Bute council to stop taking photos for her blog as media coverage had apparently left catering staff fearing for their jobs. But the council reversed its decision after a barrage of negative publicity in the media and on social networking sites.

15 Habits For Learning In The 21st Century | Edudemic

15 Habits For Learning In The 21st Century | Edudemic:


Defining 21st century skills is an editorial matter. There are dozens of examples floating range with a range of authority behind them—some inspired, grassroots efforts, other core brands of multimillion dollar organizations making a national push.
There is even debate as to whether they are truly necessary, the idea being that learning habits and priorities are timeless, and do not change because the world itself changes. But the scale and rate of change are unrelenting.
Culture oozes forward.
Trends and movements emerge and overwhelm old habits.
Technology does its dizzying dance.
And learning has to change with it.

Colleges Experimenting with Teaching Foreign Languages Online | Education News

Colleges Experimenting with Teaching Foreign Languages Online | Education News:


Two schools have recently launched programs to offer extensive foreign language instruction over the internet, including an accredited German degree online.
As online learning begins to play a bigger role in the education landscape, some have questioned if foreign language instructional courses can make a similar transition and be successfully taught over the internet. Recently, James Madison University became the first institution of higher learning to offer comprehensive online foreign language instruction by partnering with language software maker Rosetta, the company behind the successful Rosetta Stone franchise. The move has caused other education professionals to consider the internet as a medium for language instruction.
Inside Higher Ed reports that education veterans have doubts that the internet language courses can deliver the same high quality results as those achieved via traditional method of instruction, and schools that are too eager to chase the future and the promised financial savings that come with moving courses online, risk offering their students an inferior product.

Are Charter Schools Actually Serving Students Better? | Education News

Are Charter Schools Actually Serving Students Better? | Education News:


A GAO study shows charters enroll 3% fewer special education students, but is this difference down to labeling and better early education standards? 
A GAO study has found that charter schools enroll 3% fewer special education students than traditional public schools. Disabled students represent 11.2% of students attending traditional schools — and only 8.2% of students enrolled in charter schools for the 2009-10 year. Data was sourced from the Department of Education.
Lisa Snell, writing for the Reason Foundation Out of Control Policy blog, finds the premise of the GAO report suspect. She draws a distinction between serving a child and merely enrolling them, or labeling a wider variety of children as special education. Indeed, Snell suggests that while the original analysis implies that public schools are serving special needs children better by having a higher rate of special education designation, an equally like explanation is that public schools are more experienced at gaming the funding system.

segunda-feira, 25 de junho de 2012

Online Testing on the Rise - Digital Education - Education Week

Online Testing on the Rise - Digital Education - Education Week:

Digital Education


By guest blogger Mike Bock
According to a recent press release from publishing market analyst firm Simba Information, online K-12 testing is poised to increase significantly in the next few years, and will make up 50 percent of the market for testing by the 2014-2015 school year. Presumably, the report speculates, big publishers like CTB/McGraw-Hill and Vantage Learning are starting to ramp up their online test production to meet the demand for more virtual assessments.
In the 2011-2012 school year, only 38 percent of assessments were offered online. Simba Information is attributing the big jump to the rise of Common Core assessments:
"New Common Core classroom assessments, which will be used to help drive instruction and gauge individual student progress, will focus on more performance-based and media-driven items, including adaptive learning technologies. Coupled with a move towards digital textbooks and instruction, the report finds the implementation of a formative learning process into an individualized learning environment is a key factor for success."

Yes, Schools Have an Alternative to Zero Tolerance - Democracy and Education - Education Week

Yes, Schools Have an Alternative to Zero Tolerance - Democracy and Education - Education Week:

Democracy and Education


We Welcome Derek Slaughter, a high school student from Baltimore.  He calls on a timely issue that is blocking many students’ opportunity to learn. -- Greg
Justice for All
By Derek Slaughter
Throughout my educational career, I have heard my peers say that things aren’t fair or that they have been unjustly punished in schools. Administration being overzealous to implement extreme disciplinary action is a common theme in schools throughout the country, which I have observed in my travels. For this reason the National Student Bill of Rights movement believes in installing restorative justice systems in communities and schools.
The principles of restorative justice require people to look at the root cause of the offender’s actions before the implementation of an arbitrary “punishment.” Through the restorative justice process, there is no need to enact zero tolerance: participants can see that there is a much better alternative. It is important to emphasize that students must be actively involved and engaged in restorative justice systems in order to keep these systems from returning to a regular authoritarian discipline structure.

Michigan Explores Ideas on Computer-based Student Assessment | Education News

Michigan Explores Ideas on Computer-based Student Assessment | Education News:


As part of an effort by reps of 26 states, Michigan is considering an adaptive test-taking system which tailors questions based on students’ previous answers.
Michigan is exploring the possibility of using online exams for student assessment in order to better gauge each test-taker’s achievement level. The implemented system would be adaptive to the skills of every student, substituting questions on the fly based on the difficulty of the question the student had answered correctly during the course of the exam. Michigan is one of 26 states in the U.S. working to develop and roll out the system, which they hope will go live after the 2014-2015 school year. The new system is thought of as a replacement for the Michigan Education Assessment Program, which will be retired.
Not only will the new system give districts a better idea of academic outcomes, the data provided will also go to helping the teachers better tailor lesson plans to their students’ particular strengths and weaknesses. As part of the rollout, so-called “interim tests” will be given throughout the year, in part to provide that kind of teacher guidance.