quinta-feira, 21 de março de 2013

Foradian Technologies - Official Blog

Foradian Technologies - Official Blog:

Interesting story about the origin of ‘+’ and ‘-’ signs in arithmetic




We can we never think of mathematics without the ‘+’ plus and ‘-’ minus signs. While we do have a plethora of mathematical symbols for division(÷), multiplication (×), integral (∫)etc, at its core its always the ‘+’ and ‘-’ symbols. From our elementary days, we’ve been taught about these two integral symbols. It could be considered as the ABC’s of mathematics and things wouldn't have been the same without them. The same symbols are used everywhere, around the world. A little curiosity to know how these originated and evolved to present form wouldn't hurt.
The signs as used in the earliest civilizations
The plus and minus signs (+ and −) are mathematical symbols used to represent operations of addition and subtraction as well as the notions of the positive and negative. Moreover, the Plus and Minus are Latin terms meaning "more" and "less", respectively. The origins of these two symbols dates back to the Egyptian hieroglyphics where they used symbols which resembled ‘a pair of walking legs’, either walking away or towards, representing addition or subtraction. Similarly, just like the Greeks, the Hindus too, did not have a particular sign for addition and subtraction. Many a times, they used ‘yu’ to mark addition. ‘Yu’ was used in the Bakhshali manuscript arithmetic, belonging to the period of 3rd or 4th century. It was in the early 15th century Europe, it was noted that ‘P’ and ‘M’ were used for the same. 

quarta-feira, 20 de março de 2013

Education Week: Districts Forge School-to-Home Digital Connections

Education Week: Districts Forge School-to-Home Digital Connections:




But education leaders are wrestling with how to put measures in place to allow school-issued digital devices to go home with students


Ashley McCaslin teaches in a one-room schoolhouse on the island of Frenchboro, about eight miles off the coast of Maine.
In her classroom, where seven students span six grade levels—from kindergarten to 7th grade—each has his or her own state-issued MacBook.
Whether class members are participating in a video discussion via Skype in reading groups with students in other communities, writing essays in Google Docs, or building a social studies wiki, McCaslin sees the laptops as their key link to the outside world. And, she says, for the 7th graders, who take the devices home in the evenings and on weekends, they offer nothing short of salvation.

quarta-feira, 13 de março de 2013

Digital Inclusion 'Imperative' for American Education -- THE Journal

Digital Inclusion 'Imperative' for American Education -- THE Journal:





Despite tough economic circumstances and sequestration, federal investment in education technology "can't wait," according to United States Representative George Miller, who addressed education leaders Monday at the CoSN 2013 conference in San Diego, CA. Miller, senior Democrat on the House Committee on Education and the Workforce, has introduced legislation that would bring back funding specifically targeted toward technology in education, funding that has dried up with the end of Enhancing Education Through Technology (EETT) and the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act.
The legislation, Transforming Education Through Technology (PDF), would authorize $750 million in fiscal year 2014 "and such sums as may be necessary for each of the succeeding 4 years" to provide for the purchase of hardware, software, and services and to provide professional development for educators and administrators. Included in the total is $500 million in state grants (like EETT) and $250 million dedicated to the "Technology for Tomorrow Fund," a competitive education partnership grant aimed at programs that "improve student achievement, academic growth, and college-and-career readiness through the use of technology and digital learning."
"These are tough economic times," Miller told THE Journal in an interview at the CoSN conference. "We have sequestration. But it's becoming clearer and clearer from more and more economic studies that this investment can't wait, if we really want the results that we need — we need — as a nation from our educational systems.... We, the federal government, have been standing on the sidelines, and we've got to get back into the game. That's the purpose of this legislation."

sexta-feira, 8 de março de 2013

Is This Now A Typical Classroom? - Edudemic

Is This Now A Typical Classroom? - Edudemic:

I just stumbled across an interesting photo originally posted on Gizmodo. Their title was ‘Are Computers Ruining Education?’ which of course catches the eye but it’s really not the story. While there may be an influx of computer in classrooms these days … it’s nothing new. There are countless 1:1 classrooms now. It’s all in how those computers are used.

How A School Gets Students Excited To Learn Outside The Classroom

How A School Gets Students Excited To Learn Outside The Classroom | edudemic




While controlling an underwater remotely operated vehicle, Te’shon Dickens carefully collected submerged items, confident of his wiring and waterproofing. His team spent more than a month configuring the device.
“This is pretty awesome – making and controlling your own submarine,” said 12-year-old Dickens, standing beside a pool Feb. 22 at Woodmen Hills Recreation Center in Peyton, Colo. He’s not a marine robotics technician.

Should teachers bring ICT into the classroom? | EurActiv

Should teachers bring ICT into the classroom? | EurActiv:



Education experts and lawmakers gathered this week in Brussels at the invitation of US software giant Microsoft to debate the role that information and communication technologies (ICT) should play in education.
The new generations of children use ICT on a daily basis at home, but not as much in school as they should in order to stimulate creativity